“A List of Cages” by Robin Roe

Quick Statistics

  • “A List of Cages” by Robin Roe
  • Young Adult Realistic Fiction
  • Read as an ARC, thanks to NetGalley
  • 4/5 stars
  • Finished January 2, 2017

Official Synopsis

When Adam Blake lands the best elective ever in his senior year, serving as an aide to the school psychologist, he thinks he’s got it made. Sure, it means a lot of sitting around, which isn’t easy for a guy with ADHD, but he can’t complain, since he gets to spend the period texting all his friends. Then the doctor asks him to track down the troubled freshman who keeps dodging her, and Adam discovers that the boy is Julian—the foster brother he hasn’t seen in five years.

Adam is ecstatic to be reunited. At first, Julian seems like the boy he once knew. He’s still kindhearted. He still writes stories and loves picture books meant for little kids. But as they spend more time together, Adam realizes that Julian is keeping secrets, like where he hides during the middle of the day, and what’s really going on inside his house. Adam is determined to help him, but his involvement could cost both boys their lives…

My Thoughts/Summary

Wow, this book honestly blew me away. I wasn’t really sure what to expect, I’ve found so many YA novels just aren’t meeting my expectations anymore, which is sad because it’s absolutely one of my favorite genres. This one, however, blew me away.

I’ll be honest, I can’t remember the last time I read a book that I really loved with two male main characters. I read the first two books in the Maze Runner trilogy and then gave up because they frustrated me so much, but other than that, I tend to gravitate towards the book with female protagonists who are taking on the world. I’m a sucker for this. This, however, is one I am so glad I was approved for, and I devoured it.

This book wasn’t easy to read but in the same vein, it was. What does that mean? The content was not easy. It delves into some huge things like child abuse, foster care, and others, and at it times it gets really intense and hard to read. However, I think this makes it all the more important to read (if these things aren’t triggering for you). When I say it was easy to read, the Lexile level of this book isn’t difficult. The words are easy to understand, but again, that doesn’t make the contents of this book easily digestible.

This book is realistic in my opinion, some of the abuses that one of the characters goes through is extreme but believable, and the ending was really great. I could understand if people didn’t like it, or thought it was too much, but I felt really satisfied by it, and would highly recommend this book. I feel like this book is going to blow up, and it will absolutely be deserving of that.

Follow-Up Links

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